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Login | Join Home »News »Blogs »5 Lessons Learned: At Bengals .

Sarah Ellison
5 Lessons Learned: At Bengals
Posted by Sarah Ellison on Sunday, September 19th, 2010 at 8:30 pm | Categories: 2010 Season, Sarah Ellison, Week 2 at Bengals

Font Size: PLEASE NOTE: The opinions, analysis and/or speculation expressed on BaltimoreRavens.com represent those of individual authors, and unless quoted or clearly labeled as such, do not represent the opinions or policies of the Baltimore Ravens’ organization, front office staff, coaches and executives. Authors’ views are formulated independently from any inside knowledge and/or conversations with Ravens officials, including the coaches and scouts, unless otherwise noted.

A rattled Flacco needs help from the rushing game. I wouldn’t go as far as some of the fans that are already calling for quarterback Joe Flacco’s starting job, but we did learn that the Bengals’ defense consistently rattles the third-year quarterback. Flacco threw for one touchdown and four interceptions in two losses to Cincinatti last season. You can double that interception stat after Sunday’s terrible performance. Part of the problem is that there was a lot of passing plays and few running plays. When asked after the game what was the key in keeping Flacco out of rhythm, Bengals Head Coach Marvin Lewis said it was keeping running back Ray Rice hemmed in. Rice only had 16 carries and did a lot with them, averaging 5.4 yards. Willis McGahee added just three rushes and Le’Ron McClain only one. The game was never so far out of reach that Baltimore had to play catch-up, so when Flacco was struggling, Rice and Co. would have been a good option to bail him out of a nightmare day. They just need to get the ball more often.

The league is too careful with quarterbacks. Can somebody please tell me what Terrell Suggs was supposed to do to avoid the roughing the passer penalty besides giving up on the play and letting Carson Palmer have an open shot at his receiver? As Suggs said, the NFL is going to protect the players (namely quarterbacks) that pay the bills, but this is still football and the call went too far. Suggs was already engaged when Palmer still had the ball in his hand and Suggs hit him in the strike zone. If the league stands by the call, they owe Suggs and the Ravens an explanation on what roughing the passer actually is. The tripping call against Ray Lewis was also debatable. Both penalties led to a field goal, but it didn’t lose the game for the Ravens.

Offseason cornerback concerns and cries were overblown. He isn’t Peyton Manning, but Palmer is the next best thing. The Ravens brought plenty of pressure – sometimes successfully, sometimes not so successfully – leaving the corners with little help to guard potent receivers Chad Ochocinco, Terrell Owens and rookie Jermaine Gresham. The story of the game was Flacco’s horrible day, so it’s worth pointing out that Palmer (159) and Flacco (150) had similar passing yard stats. Most were hesitant to give the corners credit after last week’s dominance over the Jets’ young Mark Sanchez, but…

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